Awards & Prizes

Simulation Awards

2nd Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation (CAMES) Award

Jeffrey J. H. Cheung and colleagues won the 2nd Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation (CAMES) award for best journal article in the area of simulation based education (SBE) at AMEE 2017, Helsinki, Finland

Knowing How and Knowing Why: testing the effect of instruction designed for cognitive integration on procedural skills transfer

By extending findings on cognitive integration from clinical reasoning to simulation-based procedural skills training, our study adds an instructional design feature that has largely been over-looked in this domain: integrated instruction that helps learners form relationships between their procedural knowledge of how and their conceptual knowledge of why when learning a procedure.

Adv in Health Sci Edu
DOI 10.1007/s10459-017-9774-1

The winner will be awarded the CAMES Award of £1000.

Inaugural Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation (CAMES) Award

Jennifer Cleland and colleagues Kenneth G Walker, Michael Gale & Laura G Nicol from University of Aberdeen have won the inaugural Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation (CAMES) award for best journal article in the area of simulation based education (SBE) at AMEE 2016 in Barcelona, Spain.  

Their study Simulation-based education: understanding the socio-cultural complexity of a surgical training ‘boot camp’ is the first empirical study  to take a socio-cultural approach to exploring and understanding context, complexities, uncertainties and learning associated with a boot camp model of SBE. The authors engaged Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) along with Bourdieu’s concept of “Field” within an overarching framework of complexity theory in a surgical boot camp setting to help illuminate the multiple and intersecting social factors that inform learning in simulation based educational contexts.

What the authors found suggests that a boot camps are as much about social and cultural processes as they are about individual, cognitive and acquisitive learning. This is a beautifully designed study that incorporates explicit theoretical frameworks to advance our understanding about the potential impact of simulation as a socio cultural as well as educational undertaking.

Publication Information:
Simulation-based education: understanding the socio-cultural complexity of a surgical training
‘boot camp’.  Jennifer Cleland, Kenneth G Walker, Michael Gale & Laura G Nicol.
Medical Education 2016: 50: 829–841.  doi: 10.1111/medu.13064
 

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