Several symposia sessions will be held at AMEE 2020. Symposia sessions are a series of short presentations by panellists on issues that are topical, and may be controversial, to stimulate debate and discussion with the audience. 



The following symposia will be streamed live:

  • 3A: Peer review: keeping horses in the stable or encouraging them to bolt?
  • 3B: Can EPA Assessment Data Collected in Medical School Facilitate Transition to Residency?
  • 4A: Transition from Medical School to Surgery Residency Training
  • 4B: Digital assessment in the clinical workplace: design, implementation – opportunities, challenges
  • 5A: Exploring sustainable health care education: An international endeavor - Moving from the what to the how
  • 5B: The Doing, Knowing, Being, and Becoming of a Healthcare Professional: Curricular Innovations for Cultivating Learners’ Moral Compass and Resilience Within Professional Identity Formation
  • 7A: Is the role of the teacher mirrored in the role of the learner?
  • 7B: Faculty Development Beyond 2020 – Agility, Connection, Impact, Sustainability
  • 8A: Best Success begins with Failure – Our True Stories
  • 8B: Embracing PG training diversity: lessons from Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • 9A: Sharing of Learning Resources: The teacher as a curator
  • 9B: Serious games: Do they offer serious and engaged learning?
  • 10A: Empathy for Optimal Patient Care: Critical ingredient or optional seasoning?

Session 3: Monday 7 September - 1015-1200

3A: Peer review: keeping horses in the stable or encouraging them to bolt?

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Clyde Auditorium
 
Facilitators:

  • Tim Dornan, Queen's University Belfast, UK

  • Richard Hays, MedEdPublish, Australia

  • Martin Delhunty, Inspiring STEM Consulting, UK

  • Richard Hays, MedEdPublish, Australia

  • Representative, F1000

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Pre-publication peer review is currently the ‘gold standard’ of academic rigour. It results, though, in good articles being rejected or altered beyond recognition. Peer review, though, has been authoritatively described as so unreliable that, if it were a drug, it would not be allowed on the market. This symposium will consider whether peer review is the best means of advancing the field or conserves the status quo. It will present post-publication peer review as an alternative, ask whether this could be a more democratic route to scholarly excellence, and whether wastage of good work and disillusionment of authors could become a thing of the past.

3a-peer-review-keeping-horses-in-the-stable-or-encouraging-them-to-bolt

3B: Can EPA Assessment Data Collected in Medical School Facilitate Transition to Residency?

3b-can-epa-assessment-data-collected-in-medical-school-facilitate-transition-to-residency

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Lomond Auditorium, SEC Loch Suite
 
Facilitators:

  • Jonathan Amiel, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons, United States

  • Dorothy Andriole, Association of American Medical Colleges, United States

  • Sebastian Uijtdehaage, Uniformed Sciences University of Health Sciences, United States

  • Laura Hopson, University of Michigan, United States

  • Daniel West, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, United States

  • Dorothy Andriole, Association of American Medical Colleges, United States

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Implementations of EPAs for medical students are now well underway and early outcomes of their feasibility are promising. Now that learners from medical schools that have implemented EPAs are making their way through graduate medical education (GME), it is critical to reflect on the utility, benefits, and risks of using EPA assessment data to facilitate the transition to residency. We will summarize the current literature and its gaps in the use of EPAs to guide learners and educators through an individualized transition. Discussion will include: 1. What is the alignment of medical school EPA assessments with program directors’ observations of residents’ preparedness at the start of GME? 2. Can EPA assessment data inform a transfer of information about a learner so that program directors are better equipped to anticipate learner and system needs? 3. What are the risks of feeding information forward? 4. How will/should EPA assessment data influence program directors’ selection of residents? 5. How do we manage the tension between the need for summative competency decisions and formative assessments to support mastery learning behaviors? 6. How can EPA-based assessments support mastery learning and also be used for summative decisions? 7. How can these EPA-based assessment strategies be used in the GME space to create a meaningful continuum across UME and GME? This symposium aims to open a conversation about these questions anchored in the discussants’ experiences working with medical students and residents engaged in EPA implementations.
Who should participate:  Medical students, residents, educators, administrators and policy-makers interested in and/or involved in competency-based medical education.
What participants will gain:  Participants will be able to describe several EPA implementations in undergraduate programs and their impact on the transition to residency. Through a structured discussion, review of pertinent case studies and Q&A, participants will be able to consider key questions about the potential impact of sharing of EPA assessment data about learners’ readiness for the transition from undergraduate to graduate medical education for learners and for their supervisors. In discussing existing data and gaps in the data, participants will be able to formulate questions for program evaluation and research.

3C: Involving Patients and Family in Achieving Meaningful Outcomes through Continuing Professional Development

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Hall 5, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • David Wiljer, University Health Network,

  • Samar Aboulsoud, Cairo University, Egypt

  • Paula Rowland, Wilson Centre, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Canada

  • Carolin Sehlbach, Maastricht University, the Netherlands

  • Alvaro Margolis, Global Alliance for Medical Education, Uruguay

  • Lisa Sullivan, Global Alliance for Medical Education, Australia

  • Samar Aboulsoud, Cairo University, Egypt

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  This symposium will explore the involvement of patients, families, clients and service users in re-imagining the delivery of continuing education for healthcare professionals in diverse contexts to achieve better outcomes for a healthier world. The symposium will examine the origins and current state of patient involvement in continuing professional development (CPD) by presenting different models, theoretical perspectives, and practical approaches to involving patients. Using an interactive, experiential case-based approach, the symposium will reflect on how patients from different global contexts have been engaged and involved in the lifelong learning of health professionals with particular attention to issues of personal and professional identify, cultural context, concepts of power and power sharing, therapeutic relationships and best practices. The symposium will address opportunities to build CPD programs that make a difference in the lives of patients and generate new perspectives to tackle emerging and urgent issues facing health care professionals and the systems in which they work. In addition, the symposium will investigate the current knowledge base and science for the integration of patient perspectives into high quality and impactful education activities and discuss new directions for research and knowledge mobilization to transform and rapidly propel the practice of CPD forward in directions that are effective, accessible, equitable and responsive to emerging global changes for our health professionals and patients alike. The symposium will amplify for participants the call to involve patients in CPD by exploring a wide range of tools and approaches. The symposium will consider education and storytelling approaches, reflect on the need for better engagement and consultation and finally contribute to the growing conversation around co-producing and co-creating the future of health professions education. Concrete, evidence-based strategies will be presented for each approach, with a particular focus on creating meaningful and productive partnerships with patients and their families. Symposium participants will be asked to reflect on how they might begin or evolve their process of involving patients in CME/CPD outcomes-based activities within diverse cultural contexts and practice settings. They will discuss challenges and solutions to designing and implementing these approaches as part of CPD programming.
Who should participate:  This symposium will be applicable to all AMEE participants who are interested in involving patients in outcomes based CPD. In addition, this will be of particular interest to attendees who are involved in the administration, delivery and research of continuing education activities. This will be important for patients, educator and students and learners as they are thinking and planning around lifelong learning that is relevant and responsive to the needs of patients and the improvement of practice to achieve better outcomes.
What participants will gain:  Participants will hear from a diverse group of world experts working together with patients and families for outcomes based health professions education. This will result in a rich conversation around involving patients in health professions education with practical examples and concrete tools and lessons to apply in their own contexts.

3D: Inter professional Simulation in Healthcare: Materiality, Embodiment, Interaction

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Hall 1, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Nancy McNaughton, University of Toronto, Wilson Centre for Research in Education, Canada

  • Madeleine Abrandt-Dahlgren, Linköping University, Sweden

  • Nick Hopwood, University of Technology Sydney, Australia

  • Michelle Kelly, Curtin University, Australia

  • Peter Dieckmann, Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulationopenhagen A, Denmark

  • Madeleine Abrandt-Dahlgren, Linköping University, Sweden

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Health care services and professionals around the world must cope with limited resources, access to health care, and issues of equity. At the same time, clinicians must improve quality in practice and enhance patient safety. These conditions pose knowledge and learning challenges which have implications for health professions education and continuous professional development. Many have called for enhanced inter professional collaboration (IPC) and teamwork as one of the means to accomplish a sustainable and safe health care system, requiring a renewal of professional health care education. Healthcare simulation has been proposed as a possible approach to improve IPC and teamwork, although our field requires specific guidance on how to design and structure such educational events. This symposium organized by the AMEE Simulation Committee bring together a panel of practitioners, educators and researchers to explore two important dimensions of this burgeoning field. First, our panel will explore theoretical and methodological frameworks for the conceptualization of inter professional simulation practices. Second, we will direct our attention to how pedagogies for simulation can be reformed to meet the demands of future healthcare and research.
Who should participate:  This symposium is appropriate for educators who are interested in simulation as an interprofessional educational approach, and have some experience with simulation-based education.
What participants will gain:  a) Knowledge of theoretical and methodological frameworks that support simulation applications across health professions and disciplines b) Insights from different professional and paraprofessional backgrounds about the new pedagogical approaches for learning and practicing collaboratively. c) Appreciation for the variety of opportunities for simulation-based educational design across a range of disciplines and professions

Session 4: Monday 7 September - 1400-1530

4A: Transition from Medical School to Surgery Residency Training

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1400-1530
Location:  Clyde Auditorium
 
Facilitators:

  • Ajit Sachdeva, American College of Surgeons, USA

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Transition from medical school into surgery residency training is associated with many challenges and continues to be the subject of considerable attention, both nationally and internationally. Concerns about the preparation of medical students to enter surgery residency training are widespread and major gaps in the knowledge, clinical skills, and technical skills of entering surgery residents have been demonstrated. These gaps need to be addressed to ensure delivery of safe patient care, provide residents the appropriate level of supervision, and establish a solid foundation for further training. Strategies aimed at education in medical schools should include development and implementation of structured, competency-based curricula; redesign of the final year of medical school; implementation of capstone courses or boot camps; and validation of the knowledge and skills of medical students prior to graduation. Also, the knowledge and skills of entering residents should be assessed and the gaps identified should be remediated through targeted interventions. The Symposium will focus on this important transition. Speakers from across the globe will share experiences from various countries and highlight the advances that have been made to address the challenges during this transition. Practical, take-home messages will help attendees implement new approaches at their home institutions and should foster collaboration among surgical educators from different countries.

4a-transition-from-medical-school-to-surgery-residency-training

4B: Digital assessment in the clinical workplace: design, implementation – opportunities, challenges

4b-digital-assessment-in-the-clinical-workplace-design-implementation--opportunities-challenges

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1400-1530
Location:  Lomond Auditorium, SEC Loch Suite
 
Facilitators:

  • Silas Taylor, UNSW Medicine, Australia

  • Colin Lumsden, Manchester University, UK

  • Eeva Pyörälä, University of Helsinki, Finland

  • Richard Cooke, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa

  • Jennifer Hallam, University of Leeds, UK

  • Karen Scott, University of Sydney, Australia

  • Colin Lumsden, Manchester University, UK

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  The clinical workplace is a highly dynamic, complex learning environment. Developing clinical, procedural, communication and professional skills in an authentic clinical context is critical for modern healthcare providers. Mobile devices and applications provide a means for compiling the versatile documentation regarding students’ clinical and procedural performance, communication with patients and professional behaviour in authentic healthcare encounters. The digital data collected with mobile devices and applications are powerful tools for clinical teachers and supervisors to provide students with timely, constructive feedback for learning. This online documentation – and the conversations it promotes between students and teachers – can support students’ self-reflection on how to improve. It can also assist medical schools with quality assurance regarding clinical placements. The presenters of this symposium come from three continents and are ready to share their experiences of online assessment in the clinical workplace.
Who should participate:  The symposium is targeted at all health-care professions, both at graduate and postgraduate level, specialist training and continuing professional development, academic and assessment leads, curriculum designers and IT experts.
What participants will gain:  At the end of the symposium, participants will be able to (1) Outline the challenges of, and solutions for, implementing technological means of assessing student performance in the clinical environment. (2) Evaluate existing applications designed for assessing student learning in the clinical environment. (3) Discuss how digital data collected can be used for improving clinical placements. (4) Recognise requirements for implementing and maintaining technological solutions in their units.

4C: New directions in Health Sciences Education

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1400-1530
Location:  Hall 5, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Peter de Jong, IAMSE, the Netherlands

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  While the medical sciences continue to be the basis for the practice of modern healthcare, the field of health sciences education is always in motion. As educators we apply best practices of teaching into multidisciplinary and interprofessional curricula, we develop and implement new educational strategies and we respond with our education to developments in society such as the increase of stress, loss of empathy and resilience in health care providers and the increasing substance use in students and patients. This symposium will highlight current developments in health sciences education and will discuss their implications with the audience.

4D: Essential Curriculum Transformation - the Why and How

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1400-1530
Location:  Hall 1, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • John Jenkins, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland

  • Martina Crehan, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland

  • Pat Garcia, Northwestern  Feinberg School of Medicine, USA

  • Peter McCrorie, University of Nicosia Medical School and St Georges University of London, Cyprus

  • Harm Peters, Charité – Universitätsmedizin, Germany

  • Davinder Sandhu, Formerly RCSI Medical University of Bahrain, Bahrain

  • Martina Crehan, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  The centenary of the 1910 Flexner report was marked by a number of seminal publications calling for further transformative change in the education of doctors (and other healthcare professionals).1,2 Transformative learning involves three fundamental shifts: from fact memorisation to searching, analysis, and synthesis of information for decision making; from seeking professional credentials to achieving core competencies for effective teamwork in health systems; and from non-critical adoption of educational models to creative adaptation of global resources to address local priorities.1 More recently Harden has also contributed to this debate, setting out his vision for ten key features of the future medical school.3 This symposium will share the experiences of the participating medical schools in Europe and the USA, providing insights into drivers for transformative curriculum development, the underpinning foundations and framework necessary for its planning and implementation, and specific examples of how this has been and is currently being taken forward. Many medical schools around the world are at different stages in considering, developing, implementing or reviewing initiatives to take these recommendations forward in ways appropriate to their patient, health system and societal settings. The AMEE ASPIRE curriculum development award scheme has also been developed to stimulate, encourage and inform educators and their institutions in such developments - https://www.aspire-to-excellence.org 1. Frenk J. Lancet 376:1923(2010) 2. Irby D. Acad Med 85:220(2010) 3. Harden R. Med Teach 40:1010(2018)
Who should participate:  Anyone engaged in or with an interest in curriculum reform, who wishes to participate in an exploration of drivers, rationale and implementation, shared by a team with extensive international experience of the realities of leading the extensive change management process required to undertake this successfully.
What participants will gain:  The symposium will focus on identifying high level principles which can be used to address desired curricular development in a wide variety of national and local settings. It will also provide opportunities for sharing of international experience, with focus on learning from each other, meeting colleagues with experience in this area and providing a setting in which contacts can be made for ongoing exchange of information and collaboration, as envisaged in the AMEE ASPIRE Academy initiative.

Session 5: Monday 7 September - 1600-1730

5A: Exploring sustainable health care education: An international endeavor - Moving from the what to the how

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Clyde Auditorium
 
Facilitators:

  • AMEE Sustainability Working Group

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Human health and the health of the planet are under threat. Severe weather events and climate change are impacting health and well-being. The United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals promote environmental sustainability to ensure future health and well-being. As health professional educators, not only should we be preparing a workforce to adapt to environmental challenges, but there is also a moral obligation to mitigate further environmental disruption and further global warming. Mitigation generally has health, social and economic co-benefits. This Symposium will address what we mean by sustainable health care education, planetary health and explore examples of good practice.

5a-exploring-sustainable-health-care-education-an-international-endeavor--moving-from-the-what-to-the-how

5B: The Doing, Knowing, Being, and Becoming of a Healthcare Professional: Curricular Innovations for Cultivating Learners’ Moral Compass and Resilience Within Professional Identity Formation

5b-the-doing-knowing-being-and-becoming-of-a-healthcare-professional-curricular-innovations-for-cultivating-learners-moral-compass-and-resilience-within-professional-identity-formation-

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Lomond Auditorium, SEC Loch Suite
 
Facilitators:

  • Hedy Wald, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, USA

  • Diethard Tauschel, MD, Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine; Witten/Herdecke University, Faculty of Health, Germany

  • Settimio Monteverde, PhD, MME, RN, Bern University of Applied Sciences / Department of Health Professions, Switzerland

  • Diethard Tauschel, MD, Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine; Witten/Herdecke University, Faculty of Health, Germany

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Within increasing complexities in medicine including technologic advances, economic pressures, and competing demands, challenges and what can be perceived as burden have risen for healthcare practitioners and trainees. Under these conditions, moral distress and values conflicts are common. Thus, cultivating both moral awareness and responsibility within reflective professional identity formation (PIF) and situational judgment is crucial within health professions education to secure patients´ and practitioners´ dignity. Given dehumanization in medicine (so-called “epidemic”) as an ever-present threat to medicine’s social goals, the time is now for sharpening academia’s role in contributing both to ethically safe healthcare practices and the psychological wellbeing of professionals - How best to foster trainees,’ faculty’s, and practitioners’ moral development and equip them with a moral compass? How support developing humanistic values INSIDE of each individual as foundational and complementing technical competencies? Goal of Symposium: Interprofessional speakers (Germany, Switzerland, US) who have implemented curricula supporting development of moral resilience and PIF will share strategies, perspectives on challenges faced, outcomes obtained, and lessons learned. Topics include strengthening moral resilience in nursing education including interprofessional teams and using health humanities (interactive reflective writing, art, history of medicine) supporting reflective capacity and morally resilient PIF. Symposium will include Introduction, 3 twelve-minute presentations, and 45-minute discussion with audience participants. Moderator/Discussant Hedy Wald, PhD will provide brief comments (5 minutes) on the presentations as springboard to engage audience participation which will follow.
Who should participate:  This symposium would interest any faculty, practitioner/clinician, student or administrator who is interested in implementing curricula to foster PIF with moral development/moral resilience.
What participants will gain:  Learning Objectives: By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the rationale for health professions education addressing moral development/resilience for a “moral compass” and humanistic PIF as well as challenges/barriers to implementing a program with these topics into the curriculum 2. Understand strategies facilitating successful curricular implementation of programs supporting moral development/resilience within reflective, humanistic PIF 3. Delineate outcomes that programs reported in their trainees and faculty and benefit from lessons learned

5C: Digital Professionalism and Culture - Impact on Medical Students’ Mental Health and Wellbeing

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Hall 5, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Hiroshi Nishigori, Center for Medical Education, Nagoya University, Japan

  • Ania Korszun, Queen Mary University of London, UK

  • Young-Mee Lee, Department of Medical Education, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea

  • Ali Ajaz, Queen Mary University of London, UK

  • Mariko Morishita, Center for Medical Education, Kyoto University, Japan

  • Ania Korszun, Queen Mary University of London, UK

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Although there is no doubt that our current technological advances have greatly enriched the field of education, there are also negative consequences for students of embracing digital technology devices. With the growing focus in medical professionalism curricula on supporting students’ mental health and wellbeing, many students have cited problems related to internet use and a reliance on digital technology devices, such as smart phones and tablet computers, as being a cause of stress. Internet addiction among medical students has been reported to be 5 times higher than that of general population. In this symposium, firstly, we will discuss the underlying neuroscience of behavioural addiction and how it can disrupt learning and cognition and affect wellbeing. Secondly, we will address the negative impact on mental health through factors such as cyber bullying and dysfunctional social comparison. Thirdly, we will discuss the importance of teaching digital professionalism to our students and trainees; i.e. the professional attitudes and behaviours that are expected in online environments and how culture can influence these.
Who should participate:  Those who are interested in medical professionalism and students well-being in this digital age
What participants will gain:  A wider perspective of teaching digital medical professionalism and supporting students wellbeing related to digital devices

5D: AMEE Europe - the voice of stakeholders of European medical education

Date:  Monday 7 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Hall 1, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Janusz Janczukowicz, AMEE, Poland

  • Gabrielle Jacob, WHO RC Europe, Denmark

  • Respresentatives of European Medical Education Organisation, European Medical Education Organisation, Europe

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  The purpose of AMEE Europe meetings is to create a forum for discussion about the process of European medical education and to enable the creative cooperation aimed at providing European societies with graduates of medical schools ready to take the responsibility for the provision of the highest quality health care, answering the needs of the changing and aging European population. The first two AMEE Europe sessions were held in 2018 and 2019 as part of the AMEE Executive Committee meetings. This year, we invite all European conference participants representing medical schools, experts in health professions education, teachers, researchers, administrators, students and trainees in medicine and the healthcare professions to join this symposium co-chaired by the representative of the WHO Regional Committee for Europe to initiate active cooperation aimed at ensuring that medical education in Europe meets the needs of the future health care and taking into account the UNESCO Sustainable Development Goals and the concept of One Health.

Session 7: Tuesday 8 September - 1015-1200

7A: Is the role of the teacher mirrored in the role of the learner?

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Clyde Auditorium
 
Facilitators:

  • Joy Rudland, University of Otago, New Zealand

  • Tim Wilkinson, University of Otago, New Zealand

  • Evangelos Papageorgiou, European Medical Students’ Association (EMSA), Greece

  • Agostinho Sousa, European Junior Doctors, Belgium

  • Tim Wilkinson, University of Otago, New Zealand

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Twenty years ago Professor Harden produced the AMEE guide ‘The 12 roles of the teacher’. This was superseded by the 8 roles of the teacher in 2018. The information contained within these texts is invaluable for teachers considering and developing in their role. However, on reflection this is a teacher centred approach to a dynamic relationship between the teacher, learner and the environment. Learners do not always learn what teachers teach. A more learner centred approach and one that potentially could have greater sustainability is to focus on the ‘roles of the learner’. Learner roles may mirror the roles of the teacher e.g. learners processing information as a mirror to the teacher role of information provider, but equally other roles may be unique to the learner. This symposium will explore the potential change in learners roles over the last 20 years through the perspective of a undergraduate learner, a postgraduate trainee in clinical training and a senior consultant. The symposium will make proposals regarding how we envision the future roles of the learner and teacher and the relationship or partnership that should exist.
Who should participate:  Anyone interested in teaching and learning from any Health Profession may find this symposium of interest.
What participants will gain:  Attendance will hopefully stimulate reflection on how the learner roles should be a catalyst for considering the role of the teacher. There will be opportunity to input views, through electronic polling, on the role of the learner and to compare with other participants

7a-is-the-role-of-the-teacher-mirrored-in-the-role-of-the-learner

7B: Faculty Development Beyond 2020 – Agility, Connection, Impact, Sustainability

7b-faculty-development-beyond-2020--agility-connection-impact-sustainability

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Lomond Auditorium, SEC Loch Suite
 
Facilitators:

  • Yvonne Steinert, Institute of Health Sciences Education, McGill University, Canada

  • Teresa Chan, McMaster University, Canada

  • Page Morohan, FAIMER, USA

  • Ugo Caramori, University of Campinas, Brazil

  • Patricia OSullivan, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), USA

  • Teresa Chan, McMaster University, Canada

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Faculty development (FD) has taken on a prominent role in health sciences education, offering formal and informal programs and activities to many stakeholders in multiple contexts. We have also seen significant growth in this field over the last 20 years, from both a research and practice perspective. During this symposium, we will briefly look back at what we have accomplished in FD since the start of the new millennium and highlight four areas of FD that we should pursue over the next decade to enhance agility, connection, impact and sustainability. To focus on agility, we will explore lessons learned and future directions in leadership development that can influence the responsiveness of individuals and organizations. The notion of connection will be addressed by exploring FD and online technologies, which can play a critical role in connecting faculty members to each other as well as the educational and research missions of their institutions. Research and scholarship are critical to understanding the impact of FD and we will explore future areas of inquiry for FD. Lastly, to highlight sustainability, we will examine strategies to develop the capacity of medical students and residents as future faculty members. FD will continue to play a key role in health sciences education over the next decade. To promote excellence and innovation, it is critical that we promote and pursue agility and connection while exploring impact and sustainability.
Who should participate:  This symposium will be of interest to all health professions and basic science educators, leaders, and learners, as well as faculty developers interested in designing FD programs and activities to meet the emerging needs of current and future faculty members.
What participants will gain:  By the end of this session, participants will be able to appraise the growth of FD in several areas and highlight future avenues for leadership development, the use of online technologies, research and scholarship, and ways of including learners in capacity building for the future

7C: Planning, implementing and evaluating surgical educational innovation and change

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Hall 5, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Jennifer Cleland, University of Aberdeen, UK

  • Gareth Griffith, NHS Tayside, UK

  • Kenneth Walker, NHS Education for Scotland, UK

  • Paul Lai, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

  • Satheesh Yalamarthi, NHS Fife, UK

  • Gareth Griffith, NHS Tayside, UK

  • Adarsh Shah, Centre for Healthcare Education Research and Innovation (CHERI), University of Aberdeen, UK

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Surgical education and training can be defined as a complex intervention; that is, an intervention involving several components that cannot be separated (Campbell et al. 2007; Mattick et al., 2013). These components would include the context and organisation of the wider healthcare and education systems, how training is organised, and characteristics of the trainer and trainee/resident. Approaches for planning and evaluating surgical education change and innovation must take into account this naturalistic and uncontrolled environment, ask appropriate research questions, and adopt rigorous methodological approaches that examine not just educational outcomes but the quality of the educational experience. At the same time, such evaluations must be designed and reported in a way which is acceptable to stakeholders who are arguably more comfortable with RCTS and other forms of quantitative research. The presenters will go through some of the opportunities and challenges of planning, implementing and evaluating change in surgical education. The role of context and culture, qualitative and quantitative approaches, and theory in the evaluation of surgical education change and innovation will be considered. The presenters will provide their suggestions for how to improve future study in this area, and how such research can be used for the benefit of all key stakeholders.
Who should participate:  Everyone with an interest in the design, delivery and evaluation of surgical education and educational innovation. This may be educators and faculty, who wish to learn more about how to plan evaluations, those who have been involved in change, and colleagues who wish to update their understanding of an emerging field in surgical education research.
What participants will gain:  Participants of this symposium will benefit by learning about the newest research in the study of evaluating surgical education change and innovation. They will gain an understanding of how to plan educational evaluations in surgery.

7D: Scholarship is not just research: Nurturing scholarship in health professions education

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Hall 1, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Eeva Pyörälä, University of Helsinki, Centre for University Teaching and Learning; AMEE Fellowship Committee, Finland

  • Subha Ramani, Harvard Medical School, Dept of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; AMEE Fellowship committee, USA

  • Rashmi Kusurkar, Amsterdam University Medical Centra – location VUmc; AMEE Fellowship Committee, the Netherlands

  • Gary D. Rogers, School of Medicine and Health IDEAS, Griffith University; AMEE Fellowship Committee, Australia

  • Subha Ramani, Harvard Medical School, Dept of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; AMEE Fellowship committee, USA

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  The three fundamental criteria of scholarship state that scholarly work should be available for peer review and critique, publicly disseminated and accessible for exchange and use by other professionals. However, scholarship is traditionally viewed as synonymous with research or the scholarship of discovery. Experts such as Boyer (1990), and Shulman and Hutchings (1987, 1999) emphasized the need to define, recognize and reward the scholarship of teaching. As health professions educators engage in professional development and initiate research projects, they often experience uncertainty in applying theoretical frameworks and adopting methodologies and avenues to disseminate their work. In this interactive symposium, a subgroup from the AMEE Fellowship Committee aims to explore criteria for educational scholarship, use brainstorming to discuss practical application of these criteria and describe concrete strategies for advancing from teaching to scholarly teaching and finally scholarship in health professions education. We unravel the theoretical foundations of the scholarship, giving examples of how interdisciplinary and interprofessional collaboration, mentoring and networking nurtures scholarship. Thus, this symposium will showcase the core mission of AMEE to promote international excellence in health professions education, as well as the purpose and value of the fellowship scheme and its mentoring initiatives aimed at the professional development of educators and educational scholars worldwide.
Who should participate:  This symposium will benefit all health professions educators initiating or advancing their careers as educational scholars, and interested in discussing strategies for successful scholarship, regionally, nationally and internationally.
What participants will gain:  Participants will: • Gain knowledge regarding clear definitions of various types of scholarship and practical approaches to successful scholarship in health professions education. • Discuss the value of interdisciplinary, interprofessional collaboration, mentoring and networking in promoting scholarship. • Reflect on and apply practical suggestions, means and tips to advance as educational scholars at their own institutions, nationally and internationally.

Session 8: Tuesday 8 September - 1400-1530

8A: Best Success begins with Failure – Our True Stories

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1015-1200
Location:  Clyde Auditorium
 
Facilitators:

  • Ardi Findyartini, Department of Medical Education Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia, Central Jakarta, Indonesia

  • Shuh Shing Lee, Center for Medical Education, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS, Singapore

  • Ikuno Shimizu, Shinshu University, Japan

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Most of the concepts or frameworks that we have employed in health professions education in Asia are mainly coming from the Western regions. Some are successful while some are not due to context, values and cultural differences. Values and culture have been embedded in the daily life of teachers, administrators, leaders, students and the organisation and need to be considered during attempts to implement best practices in medical and health professions education. When certain initiatives do not achieve the expected outcome, ‘we’ struggle, feeling frustrated, and sometimes helpless and guilty about the failure. Failing teaches us what went wrong, how to improve and what are the skills/competence lacking of to succeed. However, often we hesitate to disclose our failure. ‘We’ in this context could be (i) administrators who operationalise the initiatives/programmes; (ii) teachers who conduct the teaching; (iii) students who undergo the programme; (iv) faculty developers who train the health professions educators. In this symposium, different speakers with different roles around the Asia regions share their thought on the initiatives that they have implemented, the struggles that they faced, how they overcome these challenges using their wisdom and the lessons learned. The speakers of this symposium will be comprised of administrators, teachers, faculty developers and students to provide a broad perspectives on this topic.
Who should participate:  All health professionals educators, leaders, administrators and students
What participants will gain:  Participants will gain a perspective of how the future health professions schools will be and how to prepare, as an educator, educational leaders, students and administrators, to this shift.

8a-best-success-begins-with-failure--our-true-stories

8B: Embracing PG training diversity: lessons from Obstetrics and Gynaecology

8b-embracing-pg-training-diversity-lessons-from-obstetrics-and-gynaecology

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1400-1530
Location:  Lomond Auditorium, SEC Loch Suite

Facilitators:
•    Simon Gregory, Health Education England and AMEE Postgraduate Committee, UK
•    Rille Pilak, The Christie and AMEE Postgraduate Committee, England
•    Juliana Sá, University of Beira Interior, Portugal
•    Gustavo Salata Romão, Febrasgo / University of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
•    Sheyla Ribeiro Rocha, Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil
•    Rille Pilak, The Christie and AMEE Postgraduate Committee, UK
    
ABSTRACT:

Summary of theme and why it is important:  Submitted on behalf of the AMEE Postgraduate Committee - Why it is important: Postgraduate training is critical to delivery of effective and high quality care however, there are major differences in PGT around the world. Entrance exams, competences, assessments, length and setting of training, feedback and supervision, are only some of the disparities between specialty training programmes in different countries and continents. This symposium will review the opportunities and challenges PGT faces around the world using the Ob-Gyn curricula as an example, with the hope of learning from the best examples and building a more unified training everywhere. The acquisition of appropriate clinical competencies can be attained by different ways and it brings up critical issues of PG curricular span and designs. A broader perspective on diversity of PG training programs around the world enable reflections to face the challenges. Recent decades have seen major changes in PGT that are usually more due to pressures of the healthcare systems rather than based on medical education evidence. The session will introduce attendees to the diversity of PGT around the globe and will outline initiatives and results from medical education research that aim to improve PGT in different settings.
Who should participate:  All AMEE 2020 participants interested in postgraduate training. Especially those who have responsibilities or leaderships positions in building PG training and all junior doctors who are in the receiving end of these programmes.
What participants will gain:  • Better insight on PG training span and diversity around the world • Broader perspective on diverse ways to acquire clinical competences in PG • Reflect on diverse ways to face the challenges in PG training • Reflect on the future of PG training all around the world • Meet and get to know the AMEE PGME community

8C: Primum non nocere: assuring patient safety and professional competence in a world of medical professional migration

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1400-1530
Location:  Hall 5, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Valerie Wass, UK

  • Trevor Gibbs, President AMEE, UK

  • Trudie Roberts, Past President AMEE, UK

  • Harm Peters, Treasurer AMSE, Germany

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Global migration is escalating. Given the political and geographical challenges facing the planet, predictions are that population movement will continue expanding. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) report on G20 migration and displacement 2019 (1) shows that >10 million people migrated to G20 countries in 2018. Refugees stood at 25.7 million. Medical education must adapt to medical professional and patient migration. Yet it has been slow to react despite the 2010 Lancet report recommendations (2). How will professional migration impact on patient safety? In the UK, referrals to the medical regulator for performance related concerns are higher for doctors who qualified overseas than for those trained in the UK. Differential attainment of ethnic minority groups in competency assessments remains of international concern. What are the issues around patient safety for doctors working in different healthcare settings? How must medical education change? This symposium will explore these problems in relation to patient safety. The panelists will open debate by highlighting the migration issues and exploring how health care workers can be trained for global movement and supported, if they move, to assimilate into new cultures. We will examine how transformational learning and new technologies such as virtual reality might support this enculturation and ensure high levels of professional competency. 1: https://www.oecd.org/migration/mig/G20-migration-and-displacement-trends-and-policies-report-2019.pdf 2: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61854-5/abstract
Who should participate:  All stakeholders: students, trainees, clinical educators, post graduate trainers and workforce planners. We plan to include the student/ young doctor and migrant perspective on the panel. We identified this as a topic challenging many AMEE and AMSE members and potentially impacting on future patient safety. It is time we addressed this honestly and innovatively.
What participants will gain:  A deeper understanding of the implications of medical professional migration and how the issues it raises risk impacting on professional competence and patient safety. We will lead discussion into how the curriculum might change to tackle these issues exploring wider use of experiential transformational learning and virtual reality technology. We aim to encourage inclusive and extensive audience interaction and debate.

8D: Moving from eminence-based to evidence-based accreditation: defining the field of accreditation research and charting its course

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1400-1530
Location:  Hall 1, SEC

Facilitators:
•    Sean Tackett, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, USA
•    David Rojas, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Canada
•    Ming-Jung Ho, Georgetown University Medical Center, USA
•    Marta van Zanten, Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research, USA
•    Cynthia Whitehead, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Canada
•    David Rojas, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Canada
    
ABSTRACT:

Summary of theme and why it is important:  Accreditation standards and processes encompass every medical school function and therefore affect everyone in medical education and are powerful levers for change. Despite growing international momentum for accreditation, accreditation research is rare, and there remains little evidence that accreditation is worth the sizable investment it commands. Broadening the pool of accreditation researchers should lead to evidence generation that improves accreditation effectiveness and efficiency. This purpose of this symposium is to define the field of undergraduate medical education (UME) accreditation research and discuss how accreditation can become more evidence-based. In introductory presentations: Dr. Tackett will overview accreditation research and opportunities for action based on a scoping review and research he co-authored. Drs. Rojas and Whitehead will describe their experiences embedding a research program into their institution’s self-study. Dr. Ho will describe her research working with new accrediting bodies which adapted existing standards to local contexts in Asia. Dr. van Zanten will discuss research opportunities within the World Federation for Medical Education’s (WFME’s) recognition program. We will invite questions from the audience and discuss: What lines of inquiry would you like explored in UME accreditation research? How might you access or collect the data needed for accreditation research? How can you balance public reporting of accreditation data and maintaining school and stakeholder confidentiality? What logistical, political, or other barriers might you face when attempting to engage in accreditation research? How would you navigate those barriers? How can you identify collaborators or find funding for accreditation research projects?
Who should participate:  This symposium is relevant to anyone involved in medical education, especially at the basic medical education level, but has particular relevance for: Medical education researchers Persons involved in their school’s accreditation activities Persons involved with accrediting agencies or the WFME recognition program Any medical educator seeking an area of interest that could have broad impact and enhance their careers
What participants will gain:  Participants will have UME accreditation demystified and gain an understanding of how to engage in effective accreditation research.

Session 9: Tuesday 8 September - 1600-1730

9A: Sharing of Learning Resources: The teacher as a curator


Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Clyde Auditorium

Facilitators:

  • Dujeepa Samarasekera, National University of Singapore (Moderator)

  • Representatives from developers of learning resources

ABSTRACT:

Summary of theme and why it is important: 
The role of the teacher is rapidly changing from that of a provider of information to one of a curator, taking account of the wealth of resources now available digitally.  A panel of resource developers will discuss current developments, followed by a discussion with the audience on the implications for training of both teachers and learners in the selection of use of such resources in the curriculum.

9a--sharing-of-learning-resources-the-teacher-as-a-curator

9B: Serious games: Do they offer serious and engaged learning?

9b-serious-games-do-they-offer-serious-and-engaged-learning-

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Lomond Auditorium, SEC Loch Suite
 
Facilitators:

  • Mary Dankbaar, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands

  • Pamela Kato, Designer, Social Entrepreneur Silicon Valley, Digital Health Scientist, USA

  • Shoaleh Bigdeli, Center for Educational Research in Medical Sciences (CERMS), Department of Medical Education, Iran

  • Todd Chang, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles & Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, USA

  • Tjitske Faber, Erasmus University Medical Center, the Netherlands

  • Joy Lee, Maastricht University, the Netherlands

  • Jeroen van Merrienboer, School of Health Professions Education, Maastricht University, the NetherlandsPamela Kato, Designer, Social Entrepreneur Silicon Valley, Digital Health Scientist, USA

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Examples of successful development, characteristics, implementation challenges, research and design principles Summary of theme and why it is important: Serious games are increasingly being used in undergraduate and graduate medical education, as well as for patient care, for knowledge and skills acquisition or behavior change. They potentially can offer effective and engaged learning. What do we know about the potential impact of games for learning and training, what are important stages in the design and development process to make a successful game? Which game characteristics are important for engaged learning? Implementation of games in a curriculum often is a challenge, and quite often games ‘die off’ after a promising development phase. What are barriers and important factors for successful implementation? Research on game effectiveness has shown ambiguous results. We will share the results of different studies on a game that trains complex problem solving skills, and show how theoretical frameworks on instructional design can help to explain these results and inform further design-based research on games. Outline 1. Introduction Mary Dankbaar, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands (TEL committee) 2. Common myths and misunderstandings in using serious game technologies for learning. Experiences from European and US (Silicon Valley) perspectives Pamela Kato, Serious Games Designer, Social Entrepreneur Silicon Valley, Digital Health Scientist, USA. (with Q+A) 3. Overview of games and important game characteristics for training and a gamified medical curriculum Shoaleh Bigdeli, Center for Educational Research in Medical Sciences (CERMS), Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran. (with Q+A) 4. Implementation and evaluation of serious games. On the journey from development and implementation to evaluation Todd Chang, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles & Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, USA (with Q+A) 5. Research studies on a game that trains complex problem solving skills; how instructional design frameworks may inform effective game design (with Q+A) Mary Dankbaar, Tjitske Faber, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Joy Lee, Maastricht University, the Netherlands. 6. Discussion Discussion on important themes and challenges from the symposium Jeroen van Merrienboer, School of Health Professions Education, Maastricht University, the Netherlands.
Who should participate:  Who should participate in the symposium? Health professions educators across the educational spectrum, from undergraduate and graduate settings to continuing professional development, instructional designers, curriculum developers and policy-makers.
What participants will gain:  What will they gain from participating? By the end of the session, participants will be able to: • Reflect on the potential design characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of serious games in medical education for learning and teaching in healthcare. • Have insight in the development and successful implementation of games in medical curriculum. • Understand research on effectiveness of games and how design choices affect learning and motivation • Appraise how theoretical frameworks on instructional design may be used for game-based learning on complex skills

9C: Medical Humanities and Ethics in the Curriculum - Standards and Best Practices

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Hall 5, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Russell Dsouza, Department of Education UNESCO Chair In Bioethics University of Haifa, Australia

  • Mary Mathew, Bioethics Unit UNESCO Chair in Bioethics Manipal University & Department of Education UNESCO Chair, India

  • Derek Dsouza, Bioethics Centre UNESCO Chair in Bioethics Maharashtra Institute of Medical Education & Research, India

  • Madalena Patricio, Department of Education UNESCO Chair In Bioethics, University of Lisbon, Portugal

  • Joseph Thornton, Bioethics Unit UNESCO Chair in Bioethics, University of Florida, USA

  • Mary Mathew, Bioethics Unit UNESCO Chair in Bioethics Manipal University & Department of Education UNESCO Chair, India

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Factual knowledge and competence are not enough. To function in society, the doctor must have the understanding and practical wisdom about the social, ethical, legal and anthropological setting of the physician. This is much more than the importance of social accountability. Then it is not difficult to create a programme of medical education that meets the need to know and understand the relevant factual knowledge and competencies. But it is more complex to devise the curriculum for the social sciences and humanities in medicine, and for the accreditation process to verify that this curriculum and its delivery are appropriate for the doctor we need in the future. This symposium will cover the evidence-based vertically integrated bioethics curriculum from the UNESCO Core curriculum of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights that was adopted by Governments of 96 member countries of the UN on 19th October 2005, the reformed evidence-based bioethics and medical humanities teaching methodology, Technology for imparting competencies in Decision making in ethical dilemmas and the assessment technology of bioethics teaching-learning
Who should participate:  Medical Education Professionals Medical and Health Science Teaching Faculty Post Graduate and Undergraduate Medical Teaching Faculty Clinical and Non-Clinical Teachers Medical and Health Science Students
What participants will gain:  Participants will gain from the symposium competencies in: The Application of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights core curriculum integration vertically in the medical curriculum. Ethical deliberation and Decision-making process in ethical dilemmas Evidence-Based how to teach Medical Humanities and bioethics methodology Incorporating formative and summative of bioethics assessment methodology

9D: Maintaining Adaptive Expertise in the time of the Algorithm: Lessons from Aviation

Date:  Tuesday 8 September 2020
Time:  1600-1730
Location:  Hall 1, SEC
 
Facilitators:

  • Martin Pusic, Harvard University, USA

  • Maria Mylopoulos, University of Toronto, Canada

  • John Andrews, American Medical Association, USA

  • Warren Feschuk, DAC Aviation, Canada

  • Maria Mylopoulos, University of Toronto, Canada

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  This symposium will present an interdisciplinary perspective on the development and maintenance of adaptive expertise for low frequency, high impact situations in both aviation and the health professions. In particular, we will focus on the training implications of the “GPS Phenomenon” wherein the clinician (or pilot) is at risk of losing skill in the face of increased reliance on computerized systems. The recent failures of the 767-Max aircraft may hold a new lesson: one hypothesis as to why these two planes crashed is due to a failure of simulation education of the pilots. In question was whether their simulation training inculcated sufficient “airmanship” to enable the pilots to overcome difficulties that arise when an airplane that normally can fly largely on algorithm requires in-the-moment situational judgement from humans. When the interface between algorithm and human becomes so tilted towards the algorithm, is it possible to maintain sufficient high-level human expertise? This symposium will include the following elements: - Description of the 767-Max story with a focus on the simulation training of the pilots - Description of pilot training inspection mechanisms in North America and Europe - Exploration of relevant research on adaptive expertise in the health professions - Discussion of the training implications of increasing automation of cognitive work
Who should participate:  This symposium will be beneficial to all colleagues from within the health professions education community who are faced with teaching in the context of diagnostic or therapeutic guidance systems. It will also be beneficial for those whose roles include the interface between education and Quality Improvement/Patient Safety where the task of distributing cognition across a clinical system is increasingly in question.
What participants will gain:  Participants in the symposium will gain a deeper perspective on the trend towards training for adaptive expertise in the health professions by stepping outside of our field to examine closely a case study from aviation. In particular, when considering their own curriculum development or implementation, the participant will benefit from the conceptual models presented in terms of better alignment with developing trends in healthcare

Session 10: Wednesday 9 September - 0830-1015

10A: Empathy for Optimal Patient Care: Critical ingredient or optional seasoning?

Date:  Wednesday 9 September 2020
Time:  8:30 AM-10:15 AM
Location:  Clyde Auditorium
 
Facilitators:

  • Chris Skinner (Notre Dame University, Australia)
  • Gemma Cherry (University of Liverpool, UK)
  • Hilary Murphy (Ireland)
  • Gerard Flaherty (University of Galway, Ireland)                                                                                                                                              

ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important: 
Who should participate: 
What participants will gain:

10a-empathy-for-optimal-patient-care-critical-ingredient-or-optional-seasoning

10E: Evidence-Based Teaching is on today’s agenda

Date:  Wednesday 9 September 2020
Time:  8:30:00 AM-10:15:00 AM
Location:  M1, SEC Meeting Academy
 
Facilitators:

  • Madalena Patricio, Lisbon School of Medicine, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

  • Morris Gordon, UCLan, UK

  • Michelle Daniel, University of Michigan Medical School, USA

  • Erik Driessen, Maastricht University, the Netherlands

  • Morris Gordon, UCLan, UK

                                                                                                                                                         
ABSTRACT:
 
Summary of theme and why it is important:  Medical education is facing important challenges, including pressures for change as a result of globalisation, changing public expectations, the need for greater accountability, rapid advances in medicine and in healthcare delivery and the potential of new learning technologies. Evidence-based decision-making is implicit in the recognition of the need for professionalism and scholarship in the education of healthcare professions. This symposium will explore how we can move from education based on opinion to education based on evidence, including the different forms of evidence that can be used to support teachers’ decisions and how these can be accessed and adopted by teachers in their day-to-day practice. A panel of contributors will each introduce aspects of the issue. This will be followed by an interactive discussion between panel members and conference participants over 45 minutes. The session will conclude with a summary of key take-home messages. We can promise an exciting discussion

Twitter_001 facebook_001 Google_Plus_001 Linkedin_001 YouTube_001